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 Post subject: Russian and other Spies
Post Number:#1  PostPosted: 05 Jul 2010 14:05 
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Russian Spies

Ten alleged members of a Russian spy-ring have been
charged in the US with acting as foreign agents.


I don't understand why in our times anyone would need "Illegal residents" (spies), when they can do it legally apart from industrial and financial espionage. For the money that are paid to them it is possible to employ good analysts who could dig up the same information online without taking any major risks. This whole scandal sounds to me like out-of-date spin aimed at scoring points in the talks on Russia's accession to the World Trade Organisation and so on.

Countries have always spied on each other and will continue to do so. As for this specific incident, what I find suspicious is the large number of illegal residents, "spies". This looks like a staged act, rather than a result of long-term operation. Now, as it’s customary, we await similar spying allegations from the Russian side.

It's strange that after "multi-year investigations" these people have been arrested a few days after the meeting between Obama and Medvedev. I hope that Obama will not be influenced by this secret operation that seems to come more from inside the US than from Russia.

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US President Barack Obama and and Russian President Dmitry Medvedev enjoy a hamburger lunch


I think this is a hoax by forces that don’t want Russia and the USA to have a constructive relationship. This is targeted at the average people, to make them believe that all things Russian are inherently suspicious and dangerous.

What I also find repulsive are the comments made by the ex British husband of one of the arrested here in the UK, that she started behaving very strangely and did not wanted him to be present when she met her Russian friends!

SO BOYS just start watching your Russian wife for any changes of patterns in her behaviour. You never know she probably married you so she can have a deep cover while working for the Russian intelligence service!

Have you noticed that most men who married RW are claiming that they are very Hot, "Smokinghotkovas" ..... [surprised.gif]

So they must have been trained very well by their masters!

[rolf.gif] [rolf.gif] [rolf.gif]

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 Post subject: Re: Russian and other Spies
Post Number:#2  PostPosted: 05 Jul 2010 15:03 
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This seems part of a major plan to bring down desireability of Russia.

Medvedev was in the USA to take a good look as Silicon Valley, and made some contracts to start the Russia nequivalent. As Russia can throw around some serious money and there are many good people in Silicon Valley that speak Russian a coutner offensive is needed.

Enter Russia as the land where the FSB runs the show, the ghost of Stalin limits freedom and spies are everywhere....

As for the group caught, I am pretty sure that Medvedev was informed of the case, and soe FSB people might have cooperated. The "spies" were way too interested in money and fake passports, which could easily be a connection to a bandit group.
Real spies have real passports. [biggrin.gif]

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 Post subject: Re: Russian and other Spies
Post Number:#3  PostPosted: 07 Jul 2010 16:24 
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Lawyer Says Russia Seeks Spy Swap For Agents In U.S.


July 07, 2010 Radio Free Europe

A lawyer for a scientist jailed in Russia on charges of spying for the West says Russia wants to swap him for one of the alleged Russian agents detained in the United States last month.

Igor Sutyagin, a nuclear weapons expert, was convicted by a Russian court to 15 years in prison in 2004 on charges of passing classified military information to a British firm, which prosecutors said acted as a front for the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency.

Anna Stavitskaya, a lawyer acting for Sutyagin, said that Russian authorities wanted to swap Sutyagin for one of the alleged Russian spies in the United States.

She said Russia wanted the swap to take place on July 8. She did not know whom Sutyagin was to be exchanged for, and suggested Sutyagin was to be sent initially to Britain.

Human rights activists said Sutyagin had already been brought to Moscow from the prison in the Arkhangelsk region, where he was serving his sentence.

The FBI last month arrested 10 alleged members of a Russian spy ring, accusing them of operating deep under cover for the Russian foreign intelligence service in the United States since the 1990s.

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 Post subject: Re: Russian Spies
Post Number:#4  PostPosted: 07 Jul 2010 19:25 
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Russian bombshell spy, Anna Chapman


I always find it despicable when stories such as this appear.

The man is a creep. He should have kept his stories about their life together, and his photos, to himself. She was someone he was married to, someone who was special to him. He's done as much betraying as she allegedly has.


Sex Games with my ex wife in the sky

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 Post subject: Re: Russian Spies
Post Number:#5  PostPosted: 09 Jul 2010 21:46 
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Spy swap: US and Russia hand over agents in full media glare

At least one freed western spy to remain in UK after Vienna tarmac exchange for 10 Russian 'sleepers' caught in US

Moscow and Washington orchestrated the biggest and least secret spy swap in decades today, a face-saving handover that transferred 10 Russian "sleepers" arrested in America last week to Russia in return for four alleged double agents.

In the less-than-glamorous setting of a sweltering airport tarmac in Vienna, the 14 agents switched planes in a simple but significant hour-long manoeuvre intended to ensure that US-Russian relations were not derailed by the exposure of Russia's deep-cover agents in suburban America. It wasn't quite Checkpoint Charlie or the Glienicke bridge in Berlin, famous for cold war-era spy swaps. But it was Vienna, with its rich history of espionage intrigue, to which can now be added a curious footnote.

Tonight the agents had their first taste of a new life in the country of their sympathy. The Russian 10, deported from New York on Thursday, landed at Domodedovo airport south of Moscow to an uncertain future. The four westward-bound agents touched down at Brize Norton, in Oxfordshire. It is thought that at least one of them, Sergei Skripal, a former informant for MI6, will stay in Britain.

Read more here

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 Post subject: Re: Russian Spies
Post Number:#6  PostPosted: 10 Jul 2010 10:37 
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Russia's SVR intelligence agency

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The SVR operates from a headquarters outside Moscow

Russia's External Intelligence Service (SVR) is the current incarnation of one of the world's oldest and most extensive espionage agencies, known for decades as the KGB.

It officially celebrates its 90th birthday in 2010, tracing its lineage back to the Soviet Union's NKVD Foreign Department, set up on 20 December 1920.

The KGB (Committee of State Security) moniker surfaced in the 1950s, when it was officially known as the KGB's First Main Directorate, to distinguish it from the domestic secret police.

The SVR's closeness to the Kremlin is underlined by the fact that its current director, Mikhail Fradkov, and one of his predecessors, Yevgeny Primakov, both served as prime ministers of Russia.

But it is the current Russian Prime Minister, Vladimir Putin, who is undoubtedly the service's best-known graduate, having served as an agent in East Germany in the 1980s.

Today the SVR describes itself as a "modern special service employing talented, ambitious people devoted to the Motherland and their military duty".

According to a recent German government report on the service and its latter-day German operations - a report which caused indignation in Moscow - the SVR currently has 13,000 employees.

If allegations are proven that the SVR built up an extensive ring of spies in the US in the first decade of the 21st Century, it would be only the latest in a line of such operations, stretching back to at least the 1940s when the famous Soviet spy Rudolf Abel went operational in Brooklyn.

The Illegals


The New York spies, if that is what indeed they are, would be considered "illegals" in espionage jargon, meaning they operated without diplomatic or other "cover".

Col Rudolf Abel, or William Fischer (Russian: Vilyam Fisher) to give him his real name, was an "illegal" par excellence.

He was sent to the US in either 1948 or 1949 to gather information about America's burgeoning nuclear programme, the SVR records on its website.

Born and raised in England, the son of Russo-German exiles, he passed himself off as a native-born New Yorker named Emil Goldfus, a photographer by trade. Intelligence contacts knew him simply as Mark.

His covert work was to last nearly a decade, during which time he was tasked with reorganising the whole "illegal" network in the US and setting up his own system of radio communications with Moscow.

Unmasked by the FBI in 1957, he was tried and imprisoned before being famously swapped in Berlin for captured US spy plane pilot Gary Powers in 1962.

Gordon Arnold Lonsdale

Another famous "illegal" was Konan Molody, who entered the UK in 1954 as a Canadian businessman by the name of Gordon Arnold Lonsdale, and organised a ring to spy on the British submarine detection programme.

Konon Molodi, the son of a scientist, was born in Russia in 1923. He emigrated to the United States in 1933 where he changed his name to Gordon Lonsdale. He was educated in California but on the outbreak of the Second World War he returned to the Soviet Union and served in the Red Army.

After the war Lonsdale once again went to live in America. By this time he had become a KGB intelligence officer. In 1955 he moved to England where he worked as a company director. While living in England he established a spy ring that included Harry Houghton, Peter Kroger and Helen Kroger. Over the next few years obtained a great deal of information on nuclear submarines and the location of secret military bases.

In 1959 Michael Goleniewski, a Polish intelligence officer, told the CIA that two Soviet agents were operating in Britain. Goleniewski was also able to identify one of these agents as working at the Underwater Weapons Establishment in Portland. This information was passed on to MI5 and eventually came to the conclusion that this agent was Harry Houghton. By following Houghton the intelligence officers were able to discover about the activities of Lonsdale and the Krogers.

Lonsdale and his fellow conspirators were arrested on 7th January 1961. Lonsdale was sentenced to fifteen years in prison. In April 1964 Lonsdale was was released in exchange for Greville Wynne.

Gordon Lonsdale went to live in the Soviet Union but died in strange circumstances in Moscow on 14th October 1970.

Peter Kroger

Peter Kroger and his wife Helen Kroger (real names Morris and Lona Cohen) lived in New York where they were involved in spying for the Soviet Union. After the Second World War they moved to New Zealand. Later they settled in England and opened a shop selling second-hand books.

In 1955 Gordon Lonsdale, a KGB intelligence office, moved to England where he worked as a company director. While living in England he established a spy ring that included the Krogers and Harry Houghton. Over the next few years obtained a great deal of information on nuclear submarines and the location of secret military bases.

Kroger and his fellow conspirators were arrested on 7th January 1961. Peter Kroger was found guilty of spying and was sentenced to twenty years in prison. He was released in 1969 in exchange for Gerald Brooke, a British lecturer who had been arrested by the Russians for distributing subversive pamphlets.

Helen Kroger

Leontine "Lona" Cohen was born in Adams, Massachusetts. An American citizen, she was a member of the Communist Party USA and had been recruited into Soviet espionage in 1939 by her husband, Morris. She worked for Soviet case officers, including Anatoli Yatskov, out of the New York Rezidentura during World War II.

After her husband was drafted in 1942, Cohen ran a network that included engineers and technicians at munitions and aviation plants in the New York area. One of her sources smuggled a working model of a new machine gun out of a munition plant. She worked at two defense plants, the Public Metal Company in New York City in 1941 and the Aircraft Screw Products plant on Long Island in 1943.

She was a courier who picked up reports from Theodore Hall, and a source cover named "FOGEL" and "PERS" from the American secret atomic weapons project at Los Alamos, New Mexico and carried them to the Soviet consulate in New York, where a KGB sub-residency under a young engineer, Leonid R. Kvasnikov, coordinated operations and dispatched intelligence to Moscow.

After the defections of Elizabeth Bentley and Igor Gouzenko, the Cohens ended contact with Soviet intelligence until 1949, at which time they began working with Col. Rudolph Abel, a U.S. based illegal resident. After Fuchs was arrested in Great Britain in 1950, Cohen and her husband fled to Moscow, where she received additional training as a radio operator and cipher clerk.

In 1954, the pair resurfaced in London under the names Helen and Peter Kroger with New Zealand passports. They set up an antiquarian book business which was cover for their activities of running the London Illegal Rezidentura. Gordon Lonsdale worked with them as part of the Portland Spy Ring.

In the basement of their house, situated not far from the military airfield of Northolt, they set up a high speed radio transmitter and began sending Moscow "information of special importance". In January 1961, they were arrested for espionage, and in March, she received a sentence of 20 years while her husband got 25 years, of which they served only eight.

Before being taken in custody, Mrs. Kroger asked permission to stoke up the boiler. Before she could do so, Detective Smith, a veteran "spy catcher" who was in charge of the arrest, insisted on checking her handbag first. It was found to contain microdots, the photographic reduction of documents, in order to make them small enough to be smuggled out of the country more easily. In 1969, the two were finally exchanged with the Soviet Union for a British subject called Gerald Brooke. Back in Moscow, they continued training colleagues for illegal intelligence operations.

Lona Cohen was awarded the Order of the Red Banner and Order of Friendship of Nations. Her code name in Soviet intelligence and the Venona files is "Lesley".

In fact, both Lona and Morris Cohen were awarded the Soviet Union's highest award, Hero for the Soviet Union (equivalent to the United States' Medal of Honor).

The literature also contains two other intriguing items: Morris Cohen was the original recruiter of Julius Rosenberg, and the Rosenbergs were also awarded the Hero of the USSR medal.


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SVR has it's own web site in Russian: Russia's SVR intelligence agency

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 Post subject: Re: Russian Spies
Post Number:#7  PostPosted: 11 Jul 2010 05:32 
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Joe Biden jokes about 'hot' Russian spy with Jay Leno



Mr Leno showed the vice-president a photo of 28-year old Anna Chapman, one of the alleged spies.

In response to Mr Leno's questioning, Mr Biden, in a mock-serious tone, told him:
"Let me be clear. It wasn't my idea to send her back."

Full story here

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 Post subject: Re: Russian Spies
Post Number:#8  PostPosted: 11 Jul 2010 06:20 
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Life after spying


In the bad old days, home coming spies could expect heroes' welcomes in Moscow,
their faces on commemorative postage stamps and lifelong adulation.



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Russia's spies were whisked away from a Moscow airport

But that, of course, was when they were fighting evil empires, rather than living the suburban American dream.

Today's returning spies seem to have done little hard work - or at least little work for the Russian state.

The glamorous Anna Chapman, for example, appears to have spent more time flogging private planes to Russian oligarchs.

But they have all been offered a Moscow flat and a $2,000 (£1,327) state pension - the sort of riches plenty of Muscovites can still only dream of.


Full story here

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 Post subject: Did I miss something?
Post Number:#9  PostPosted: 12 Jul 2010 07:59 
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So, what's there about Russian spies? [happy.gif] Any gifts?

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 Post subject: Cold war - The Cambridge Spies
Post Number:#10  PostPosted: 12 Jul 2010 09:53 
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Cold war - The Cambridge Spies

By Phillip Knightley

If Communism had not fallen, the full story of four remarkable pro-Soviet spies would perhaps never have been told.

Today, however, the tale can be examined in a clear light, and raises the question of whether the spying game has ever been worth the candle.



A world of shadows

The hardest and most bitterly fought confrontation between the Soviet Union and the western democracies during the 50 years of the Cold War was on the espionage front. In this arena the KGB, the 'sword and the shield' of the USSR, pitted its wits against its principal adversaries - the Central Intelligence Agency of the United States (CIA) and the British Secret Intelligence Service (SIS).

The aim of each was to steal the secrets of the other side, to try to peer inside the mind of the enemy, to fathom his intentions, and to neutralise them before they could be executed. The soldiers in this war were the spymasters, the spies and their agents, all of whom operated in a world of shadows where deception and betrayal flourished.

During the spy war it was impossible to write authoritatively about it. The present author once wrote that the truth could not be told 'until the files of the KGB, the CIA and the SIS are all opened to public scrutiny' - little dreaming that this would ever happen.

But when Communism collapsed and the Cold War ended, this is exactly what did occur, and thus it became possible to tell the story of the four most remarkable spies of the Cold War, four larger-than-life Englishmen:

HAR (Kim) Philby, Guy Burgess, Donald Maclean and Anthony Blunt, all of whom betrayed their country to spy for Moscow.

In the new political climate, it became possible to tell the story both from Britain's point of view and through the eyes of the KGB. And from this tale we can draw some startling conclusions about the nature of espionage and its real value in the modern world.

The early years

In the early 1930s, the democratic world appeared to be in trouble. The Great Depression had caused widespread unemployment. Fascism was on the march in Germany and Italy. To many young students at Cambridge University, privileged though they were, this was worrying and unacceptable.

Four of them - Philby, Burgess, Maclean and Blunt - wanted to do something about it. They believed that the democracies would prove too weak to stand up to Hitler and Mussolini, and they knew that many people in Britain did indeed admire these leaders. They also thought that only the Soviet Union would be powerful enough to defeat Fascism. So, when they were approached by a recruiter from Moscow, the four young men agreed to serve the KGB.

The KGB believed that recruiting clever people from a respected university was a good game plan, because the chances were that sometime in the future these young men would be among Britain's rulers and well placed to betray their country's secrets.

This is how it turned out. By the time World War Two was underway, Maclean was climbing the ladder in the Foreign Office, Burgess was an intimate of prominent politicians, and Blunt was an officer in the Security Service - MI5. Even more astoundingly, Philby was an officer in the SIS. And all the while they were establishing themselves in these positions, these four men were reporting to Moscow.

It got better for the KGB. Just before the war ended, Philby was appointed head of the SIS's anti-Soviet section, so that the man who was charged with running operations against the Russians, was a Russian agent. Blunt, meanwhile, had been on the distribution list for material from the war's most secret operation, Ultra, decoded German radio traffic.

Then, as the Cold War got under way, Philby became SIS liaison officer with the newly formed CIA in Washington, where Maclean was first secretary at the British embassy, sitting on a committee that dealt with atomic bomb matters.

Burgess at this time was with the Foreign Office news department. Put together, their information should have been of inestimable value to Moscow. But the KGB files on these dedicated Soviet agents show a different picture.


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