All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 5 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: Putin to run for Russian presidency in 2012
Post Number:#1  PostPosted: 24 Sep 2011 14:13 
Offline
Admin
User avatar

Joined: 28 Oct 2008
Last Visit: 30 May 2020 15:36
Posts: 3640
Location: Surrey UK
Gender: Male
Status: Married
Her/His Country: Russia
RW_here_since: July 2008
Times_to_FSU: Too many to remember
Putin to run for Russian presidency in 2012

Prime Minister Vladimir Putin will run for president in March elections, while the junior member of the ruling tandem, incumbent President Dmitry Medvedev, will head United Russia's State Duma list and .

Medvedev announced Putin's bid at a United Russia party congress in Moscow on Saturday. His request that the congress back his mentor was met with a standing ovation.

"I am ready to continue my work of modernizing the country from within the government," Medvedev said. "It will be a radically revamped government."

Putin said at the congress that the decision had been made "several years ago." For years, the ruling tandem had been stubbornly dodging questions about who will run in 2012.

Putin confirmed that if he wins, he will appoint Medvedev prime minister, provided that United Russia is victorious in December.


Putin served two terms as president between 2000 and 2008, when he stepped down, citing a constitutional restriction on additional consecutive terms. He chose his longtime aide and ally Medvedev as his successor and took up the prime minister's job after the 2008 vote.

Many analysts said at the time that Medvedev was being used as a placeholder to comply with the constitution, which permits more than two non-consecutive terms.

Putin, who heads United Russia but is not a member, topped the party's list for the last Duma vote in 2007, a position Medvedev will fill in December elections, which the ruling party is poised to win, though perhaps not as convincingly as it did four years ago.

The presidential term was extended from four to six years in 2008, which means Putin, 58, can now stay in power until 2024, when he will be 70.



Read more:The Moscow Times - 4 September 2011 [click-me.gif]


Read more: Putin to run for Russian presidency in 2012 [link.gif]

_________________
.
Image


 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Putin to run for Russian presidency in 2012
Post Number:#2  PostPosted: 25 Sep 2011 16:30 
Offline
Admin
User avatar

Joined: 28 Oct 2008
Last Visit: 30 May 2020 15:36
Posts: 3640
Location: Surrey UK
Gender: Male
Status: Married
Her/His Country: Russia
RW_here_since: July 2008
Times_to_FSU: Too many to remember
Russia's finance chief rebels over Putin plan

Russia's finance minister rebelled on Sunday against Vladimir Putin's plan to make President Dmitry Medvedev his prime minister if he returns to the Kremlin by saying he would not serve in the next government.

Foreign investors were alarmed by Alexei Kudrin's snub after Putin announced he will run for president next March in an election that could extend his rule until 2024.

Kudrin, a Putin ally, has prime ministerial ambitions and said he had "disagreements" with Medvedev who may now struggle to establish his credibility as premier after being forced by Putin to renounce his dream of a second term as president.

"I do not see myself in a new government," Kudrin, 50, said in comments released in Washington, where he was meeting global policymakers.

"I think that the disagreements I have (with Medvedev) will not allow me to join this government."

Kudrin won the respect of investors as a guardian of financial stability by saving windfall oil revenues for a rainy-day fund which helped Russia through the 2008 global economic crisis.

"He is as close to Putin as Medvedev. Perhaps this is a bid for the role of prime minister," said Roland Nash, chief strategist at Verno Capital hedge fund.

Chris Weafer, chief strategist at Troika Dialog brokerage, said Putin liked both Medvedev and Kudrin but "will have to make a choice between which of the two he needs more."

POWER-SHARING AGREEMENT

Putin and Medvedev have ruled the world's largest country in a power 'tandem' since Putin had to yield the presidency in 2008 after serving the maximum two consecutive terms.

Putin, 58, won a standing ovation by accepting a proposal by Medvedev to return as president at a choreographed congress of the ruling United Russia party on Saturday.

Medvedev, 46, agreed to lead United Russia's list of candidates for a parliamentary election on December 4 in a move intended to help the party retain a two-thirds majority in the lower house and prepare him to become premier.

Putin looks certain to be elected president in March even though some Russians regard the proposed job swap by Putin and Medvedev with mistrust.

"The show went like clockwork. They decided everything for us years ago," said Irina Karpova, a 38-year-old housewife in the Urals city of Yekaterinburg.

Despite such criticism, opinion polls show other potential presidential candidates, such as nationalist Vladimir Zhirinovsky or Communist Gennady Zyuganov, have little support and liberal opposition leaders have only limited appeal.

Although Medvedev's personal ratings are high, the strength of his prime ministerial credentials are unclear after he failed to carry through many of his reform promises as president.

"Medvedev's usefulness runs out on December 5," one economist said, referring to the day after the parliamentary election.

Medvedev has failed to emerge from Putin's shadow since they started sharing power. By contrast, Putin has in more than a decade in power cultivated the image of a vigorous leader and his policies -- crushing a Chechen separatist rebellion, taming super-rich businessmen and bringing wayward regions to heel -- have buttressed his popularity among Russians.

WARY IN THE WEST

In his previous spell as president, Putin oversaw an economic boom during which household incomes improved on the back of a rise in global oil prices and his tough talking helped restore Russia's self-confidence on the world stage.

But Putin, who was once a KGB officer in East Germany, is accused by critics of riding roughshod over human rights and democracy, and expanding the power of the security forces.

Critics say his return to the Kremlin, virtually unopposed, could bring back memories of the economic and political sclerosis under Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev in the 1970s and early 1980s.

They say Putin could resist carrying out pension reforms and changes to reduce Russia's dependency on natural resources. Oil and gas revenues make up half of the budget so Russia, the world's biggest energy producer, is vulnerable to fluctuations in global energy prices.

"I'm sick of it all. Putin is clinging to power with his teeth and apparently is going to rule for life," said Tamara Zdorovenko, a 68-year-old pensioner in the Pacific port city of Vladivostok.

Putin's decision to run is likely to cause some nervousness in the West, where he is considered less liberal than Medvedev and more outspoken in his criticism of Western policies.

The U.S. government said it expected to keep making progress in the "reset" towards better relations with Moscow, whoever was the next Russian president.

"There will be a businesslike relationship, but not a warm one," said James Goldgeier, a Russia expert at American University in Washington.

Putin's spokesman, Dmitry Peskov, dismissed any concerns of economic stagnation or a deterioration in relations with the West.

"To say that relations with the West will hypothetically get worse under Putin as president is incorrect," he said.

(Reuters) By Timothy Heritage and Lidia Kelly MOSCOW/WASHINGTON | Sun Sep 25

_________________
.
Image


 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Putin to run for Russian presidency in 2012
Post Number:#3  PostPosted: 26 Sep 2011 16:35 
Offline
Hero Member

Joined: 12 Apr 2009
Last Visit: 18 Oct 2014 23:34
Posts: 1234
Location: Mainly Sakhalin Island (Russian Far East)
Gender: Male
Status: Married
Her/His Country: Russia/UK
RW_here_since: She lives in Russia
Times_to_FSU: Ya ne mogu soschitatʹ
Putin 'will not end Russia impasse' - Gorbachev

Ex-USSR leader Mikhail Gorbachev has warned Russia risks wasting six years if PM Vladimir Putin returns to the presidency in March as expected.

Reacting to the news Mr Putin will run for office in 2012, Mr Gorbachev said Russia was at an "impasse" and that he doubted Mr Putin could bring change.
*--------------------------------------*

Mr Gorbachev said he hoped Mr Putin's move would provide an incentive for the leadership to get Russia out of the "impasse" it was in, but that this was unlikely as it was he who had created the current situation.

"We can assume that there will be no movement forward if there are not serious changes along the lines of a replacement of the entire system," he wrote in the opposition Novaya Gazeta newspaper, which he partly owns.

"Without this we could lose six years. I think that the future president needs to think about this very seriously."



From the BBC
Click the ImageBBC to read the complete article.

Personal views about Gorbachev will depend on the interpretation of Gorbachev's comments.

_________________
If told to jump always ask why and never how high..Image


 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Putin to run for Russian presidency in 2012
Post Number:#4  PostPosted: 27 Sep 2011 15:34 
Offline
Admin
User avatar

Joined: 28 Oct 2008
Last Visit: 30 May 2020 15:36
Posts: 3640
Location: Surrey UK
Gender: Male
Status: Married
Her/His Country: Russia
RW_here_since: July 2008
Times_to_FSU: Too many to remember
Russia's humiliator-in-chief

Image


VLADIMIR PUTIN'S announcement that he will return to the Kremlin as Russia's president after next March's presidential election should not have come as a surprise. Everything Russia's prime minister has done over the past few months—from creating his “People’s Front” (a largely rhetorical device for hoovering up supporters) to posing on a Harley-Davidson—pointed in that direction.

Dmitry Medvedev, on the other hand, has been bending over backwards to demonstrate his loyalty to Mr Putin (who is nominally his inferior). For this, Russia's acting president has been rewarded with an offer to become prime minister.

The news will have left many Russians feeling humiliated. The job swap makes a mockery of the notion of Russian democracy. Even the 600 deputies from the ruling United Russia party who filled a massive sports arena to hear Saturday's announcement must have felt like extras in a farce when Mr Putin told them that he and Mr Medvedev had hatched their plan several years ago.

This seemed confirmation that Mr Medvedev’s presidential term was simply a device to keep Mr Putin in power without formally breaking the letter of the constitution, which barred him from running in the 2008 election because he had already served two consecutive terms as president. To Mr Putin’s credit he managed to do what almost nobody thought possible: to find a protégé who would keep his seat warm without trying to usurp it.

Moreover, it was Mr Medvedev who initiated the constitutional change that lengthened presidential terms from five to six years, paving the way for Mr Putin to occupy the Kremlin for another 12 years from March.

Read More: Russia's humiliator-in-chief [click-me.gif]

_________________
.
Image


 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Putin to run for Russian presidency in 2012
Post Number:#5  PostPosted: 13 Nov 2011 21:45 
Offline
Hero Member

Joined: 12 Apr 2009
Last Visit: 18 Oct 2014 23:34
Posts: 1234
Location: Mainly Sakhalin Island (Russian Far East)
Gender: Male
Status: Married
Her/His Country: Russia/UK
RW_here_since: She lives in Russia
Times_to_FSU: Ya ne mogu soschitatʹ
From the Telegraph.


Vladimir Putin says he is among rare breed of capable world leaders - that's why Russia needs him again

Vladimir Putin has defended his decision to return to the Russian presidency for a third time, saying there aren't enough talented world leaders to fill his generation's shoes.

Forcefully rebuffing suggestions that Russia's de facto one party political system had outlived its usefulness, he said he accepted there had to be changes but made it clear they would be evolutionary not revolutionary.

"Listen, take any country," he told a group of international academics and journalists who had flown into Moscow to meet him in the restaurant of an upmarket horse-riding club.

"(Silvio) Berlusconi is stepping down in Italy for example. (But) are there many politicians in Italy of his stature? Name me one," he demanded, after delivering a eulogy to his "great friend."

The outgoing Italian prime minister's image as a womaniser was a deliberate ploy to attract attention, he suggested, praising him for having brought years of political stability to Italy.

Arguing it would be hard for Italy to fill Mr Berlusconi's shoes, he said the dearth of talented leaders extended to America too.

"Or take the United States, there will be elections there soon. But the Republicans are winning, well they could win, but they have not got a leader! Where are they? The whole American system needs changing."

Though he did not spell it out, Mr Putin gave the impression that the same problem existed in Russia, which is why he was staying in top-flight politics.

Certain to win a presidential election in March 2012 and possibly stay in power until 2024, he tried to suggest that he was irreplaceable and was motivated to stay in power only by a selfless duty to steer what he regards as Russia's extraordinary post-Soviet renaissance.

"It does not mean that if you have got one hundred new people, they should all think they can be president," he said. "They can try, but finding people who are up to it is not easy."

His comments are likely to make uncomfortable reading for President Dmitry Medvedev, his longtime understudy, who has dutifully agreed to swap jobs with Mr Putin next year and become the prime minister instead.

The Western academics listening to Mr Putin told him they believed Russia's political system, the system he put in place in 2000, had run its course and needed urgent reform.

But while Mr Putin acknowledged it was riven with serious problems, he argued gradual reform would be enough to keep pace with a rapidly changing world. "Of course our system is not ideal," he conceded.

"But I do not know if there are ideal political systems," he added, taking a swipe at Britain's political setup that allowed Gordon Brown to become prime minister without a general election.

The Russian system was not dead in the water yet, he argued, and could be used as a platform to gradually build a new political system.

Repeating his usual criticism of the West for meddling in the affairs of other countries such as Libya, the former KGB spy hinted that his third stint in the Kremlin would not be all that different from his first two.


***


"Putin does not split in two. He is one person," he quipped. "There are basic things that are not subject to change, that will not change -- a love for the Motherland, the push for results... to increase people's wealth, and to improve internal and external security."

To read the complete article pleas click the newspaper boy Image

_________________
If told to jump always ask why and never how high..Image


 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 5 posts ] 

All times are UTC


Who is online

Registered users: Bing [Bot]


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB